asra: Peter and Tom from 'The Talented Mr Ripley' (Ripley)
[personal profile] asra2014-12-25 10:02 pm

Happy Yuletide

Quick rec: My Yuletide gift story. The Talented Mr Ripley, canon-compliant Peter/Tom, so you know what to expect at the end.

I hope lots of other Ripley fans find the fic and shower my dear anon gifter with love.

There's also another Ripley fic this year, which I'm just off to read. This one's a fix-it - which, always good!

I haven't checked the Archive for other Minghella-related fandoms yet, but will do so in a bit and update this list if I find any relevant links.
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[personal profile] asra2012-12-25 02:06 pm

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I received this utterly perfect English Patient fic as my Yuletide gift: The Past is a Ghost Story. It complements both the book and the film in gorgeous, indescribable ways. ♥
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[personal profile] asra2012-03-18 10:20 pm

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In memory of Anthony on his fourth death anniversary today, two lovely links:

Dominic's obituary for his brother

An interview with Anthony about his favourite music
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[personal profile] asra2012-02-02 01:48 pm

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Just a tiny post: an English National Opera trailer for Anthony Minghella's production of Madam Butterfly. It looks ~gorgeous.

Also, I recently had the pleasure of listening to Michael Ondaatje talk. Among other things, he mentioned that The English Patient began (in his mind) with the image of a nurse tending to a patient. When asked which of his characters is his favourite, he said it was probably Kip (which was surprising to the interviewer, who said he was expecting it to be Hana because she was played by Juliette Binoche. Haha).
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Festival Day 3: John Hurt on The Storyteller

Minghella Film Festival Review: Conversation With John Hurt and Duncan Kenworthy



According to Hurt, people are surprised when they find out who the series’ writer was. “When you say Anthony Minghella, they say, what?” )

The Minghella Film Festival will return on 11-13th March 2011. :-)
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Here is a wonderful review of the reading of Cigarettes and Chocolate at the festival.

Also, an interview with the lovely Robbi Holman, who travelled from Texas to the Isle of Wight for the festival.
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Today is Day 2 of the second annual Minghella Film Festival. The events include a screening of What If It's Raining? (1986), a reading of Cigarettes and Chocolate, and much more. Day 1 had screenings of Bruce Webb's The Be All and End All and Sam Taylor-Wood's Love You More. Go here for the complete schedule and events.

More McCall Smith on Anthony:

Anthony came to Botswana not as a European or a big shot film director, benevolently bestowing his largesse on the locals, but as a genuinely curious person, wanting to know more about the traditions and lives of the people.

... )
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Belatedly cross-posted from my journal: photographs of the cathedral in Ripley.

Peter and the frescoes )

The cathedral is the Chiesa Della Martorana in Palermo, built in the year 1143. (In the film, it's meant to be the Santa Della Maria Pieta in Venice, 'Vivaldi's own church', which 'became mysteriously unavailable' when shooting for the film began.) If you look closely at the pictures of the actual cathedral, there's no organ loft there! It was a temporary structure made for the film, and Jack Davenport and the musicians were hoisted up there. *g*
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An interview with Justin Rutledge. Rutledge will star in When My Name was Anna, the stage adaptation of Michael Ondaatje's novel Divisadero, premiering in February 2011. I so need to be in Canada then.
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Hole in the Bucket is a film by Anthony Minghella originally for the Drop the Debt campaign. The world’s poorest countries give back more in debt repayments to the richest countries than they get in aid. Producer: Timothy Bricknell.
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Alexander McCall Smith in Jaipur

I recently had the pleasure of attending a talk by Alexander McCall Smith, author of The No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency. He spoke, among other things, of working with Anthony on the film adaptation of his novel. Agency is groundbreaking in being the first film to be shot entirely in Botswana, and Smith said that the scene with the Bishop of Botswana was written by Anthony especially for the film. He said he was very glad when he first discovered that Anthony was making it, because "his films are beautiful"; he even talked a little about Ripley, calling it a film with "gorgeous textures and music".

And here is something funny that happened during the session. )
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'I want to make a beautiful film'



Minghella says: 'I want to make a beautiful film.' I think: you will. And then I think: you understand what this means to these people. The world has been unkind to Africa, and here is a chance, through you, to show the positive side of the continent, its capacity for goodness and laughter and sheer human decency.

Later, Minghella draws me into Mma Ramotswe's office, now transformed by the addition of furniture. He produces a small computer on which are stored some of the sequences already filmed.
'I want to show you the scene where the teacher is reunited with his lost son,' he says. 'We did that the other day.'
Suddenly on the screen there is a group of schoolchildren singing.
Their singing falters and the teacher sees his kidnapped son, rescued by Mma Ramotswe, running across a dusty playground to embrace him. It is so beautifully filmed that I find myself struggling with emotion. I give in.
Minghella puts a hand on my shoulder. 'That's exactly what it did to me,' he says; the kindest thing for one man to say to another when one man is overcome.


Alexander McCall Smith
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A Life photograph

Today is Anthony's 56th birthday. Here he is with Jude Law, promoting Cold Mountain in Rome, February 2004:



And an article: The Almásy Castle in Hungaria is on sale for one forint (less than a penny). Count László Almásy is the protagonist of The English Patient, and the character (played by Ralph Fiennes) is based on the real-life explorer.
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An article and a quote

An article on what Anthony changed about the ending of Nine when he revised Michael Tolkin's draft of the screenplay. Spoilers for the ending, of course. Many thanks to Kevin for finding the article.

From Flixster, something Anthony said about his work: I had never thought of myself as a director and found out that I was not. I am a writer who was able to direct the films that I write.